Category Archives: Benazir

Book Review: The Exile – Osama Bin Laden after 9/11

This is a fantastic book review in the Guardian (1 July 2017) by Owen Bennett-Jones. 

The investigative reporters have produced a revelatory work about al-Qaida members in hiding in Pakistan and Iran between 2001 and 2011. At the time of the 9/11 attacks on New York and Washington, Osama bin Laden was in an Afghan cave, unable to get a decent TV satellite signal and forced to follow developments on the radio. The contrast between his situation and his impact was to be a theme of the next decade until, eventually, the Americans caught up with him in the raid on Abbottabad, Pakistan, in May 2011. It’s a decade that The Exile describes with a remarkable amount of impressive new detail.

Investigative reporters Cathy Scott-Clark and Adrian Levy start with a detailed account of Bin Laden’s movements. When the US air strikes began, he flitted through various locations in Afghanistan, all the while trying to manage the movements of his wives and children. He was on his way to a meeting with Mullah Omar in Kandahar on 7 October 2001 when a US drone came close to killing them both. From there he moved to an underground complex in the Tora Bora mountains near the Pakistan border. The US assaulted Tora Bora but, again, Bin Laden managed to slip away, and on 14 December 2001 he turned up in the Pakistani city of Karachi. Feeling too exposed there, he moved back to Afghanistan in February 2002 before reaching northern Pakistan in the summer. There he lived with one of his wives, Amal, and their nine-month-old daughter Safiyah in the remote village of Kutkey, home to the in-laws of his courier and guard, Abu Ahmad al-Kuwaiti. Continue reading

Benazir Bhutto: A Multidimensional Portrait

Authored by Anna Suvorova, the present book is devoted to the life and work of Pakistani Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto (1953-2007). In the late twentieth century, female leaders came to power in a number of states with predominant Muslim populations (Indonesia, Pakistan, Bangladesh, and Turkey). This destroyed the gender stereotype of traditional Muslim society and promoted its modernization and democratization. This book makes an all-around study of this phenomenon of international politics, which has deep historical and cultural roots. Bhutto became the first female head of government in a Muslim state. She has been recognized the world over as a fearless fighter against dictatorship and extremism and a staunch supporter of peaceful dialogue between Islam and the West. Continue reading